September has long been known as fashion month. A time when editors, buyers, bloggers and more hit New York, London, Milan, Paris and beyond to see the latest creative works from designers and brands.Recent years have seen a backlash against these fashion weeks – the economics, waste, lack of diversity and environmental impact have caused many to rethink how fashion should be presented and call for change.When the Covid-19 pandemic halted everything, making travel an impossibility, the clever minds at Verizon’s in-house creative studio, RYOT, along with the Fashion Innovation Agency (FIA), got together to create a fashion show unlike any we’ve ever seen before: The Fabric of Reality.  The Fabric of Reality unites three, young, out-of-the-box thinker designers with leading VR artists for a completely virtual fashion show experience, which first premiered online in July 2020 but lives on in shared VR space, the Museum of Other Realities, until summer 2021 (grab your VR glasses and get watching).The project paired up designers and artists, including: Damara Inglês, who partnered with interactive artist Sutu to create a realm and garment exploring the relationship between our biological bodies and digital identities; Charli Cohen, who worked with Anand Duncan and Joy on a collaboration with Sanrio character gudetama to explore mental health; and Sabinna, who collaborated with VRHUMAN to create a post-lockdown oasis combining handcraft with hi-tech.The event breaks down the fashion world’s barriers in a number of ways, democratising the fashion show experience for people around the globe. It illustrates the immense power and potential that virtual, immersive worlds afford designers and creatives, allowing them to reimagine garments in fantastic new ways without having to negotiate the constraints of reality. Matthew Drinkwater, Head of FIA at London College of Fashion and Joseclyn Wilson, creative technologist at RYOT, two of the main architects behind The Fabric of Reality, came together for a panel discussion to discuss topics ranging from how the Covid-19 pandemic accelerated the need for a show of this type to the boundary-breaking potential of digital fashion, which will change the way we shop, produce and experience fashion. Brooke Roberts-Islam, who runs The TechStyler, hosted the discussion.According to Drinkwater, one of the goals of The Fabric of Reality was “the opportunity to demonstrate to the fashion industry that a digital showcase could be something that doesn’t need to replicate what already existed in life, for us to show that these aspirational, emotional moments can live in a purely virtual space.”Wilson talked about how consumer behavioural changes as a result of the pandemic are likely to stick around long into the future, as are the positive changes that can come from embracing future-thinking technologies (sustainability, inclusivity, etc). She also spoke to the power of VR to imprint an experience on the mind like a memory.Designers Sabinna and Charli Cohen were also part of the conversation, touching on a range of topics, like how their storyworlds came about to the messaging they wanted to get across to viewers.Charli, Ana Duncan and Joy’s “divided” storyworld used fashion to explore mental health issues, centred around Sanrio character, gudetama, a lazy egg who struggles with depression even though he’s a DJ who seems to be on top of the world. Her central garment, The Why? Coat, is an upcycled sleeping bag emblazoned with Why? messaging, worn by a central Princess Mononoke goddess figure.“With VR, you have the opportunity to actually enable somebody to see the world through somebody else’s eyes, so in terms of being able to help people empathise with issues like depression and anxiety, that’s a really incredible tool. I can’t really think of another medium that does that,” Cohen says.After participating in this project, making a purely physical garment just wouldn’t have the same impact - or be as satisfying, according to Cohen. She is working on implementing augmented reality in all of her garments before the end of the year.Sabinna’s Eternity coat is a personification of memory, captured in a garment. She and VRHUMAN created a storyworld based on nature, that merged past, present and future and explored desire to exit into a post-pandemic world, where handcraft techniques became natural wonders. “Our challenge was to capture all the textures, colours and prints, in a digital manner,” she says.Damara and Sutu’s storyworld and symbiotic garment focused on the interplay between an underwater realm and a mythical-style underworld, with an emphasis on the protective power of face filters. For Sutu, who traditionally makes his art in the comic book style, the opportunity to draw a 360-degree world around him, while wearing a VR headset, was wildly different from anything he’s ever experienced.“I’ve never been able to stand inside my artwork before,” he says. He anticipates there will be more multiplayer VR encounters in the future, where you can visit virtual environments with your friends. Also, look out for the integration of AI technologies, where artists know where you are in an environment and can make that environment react to you.Designer Damara pre-recorded a message on what she learned from the experience. “All the work was developed online, all the collaborations were online, but it feels like we actually all met each other, it feels like we actually all hugged each other. Looking back at the project, the only thing I can say is ‘Wow’,” says Damara.The VR artists who collaborated on the storyworlds, Ana Duncan, Joy and Sutu, also took part in the conversation, discussing how their art has changed with the cross-pollination of immersive technologies.In a not-too-distant future, we’ll be stepping through our screens and expressing ourselves in new ways, without the constraints of gravity and garments, where we’ll be creating new identities, faces and even personas for the day ahead. It was the stories from the virtual fashion show that stayed with people even more than the garments did, and as consumers, we’re expecting and demanding more from our digital experiences.5G is going to get us there: it will “superpower” existing technologies, according to Wilson, eliminating friction points and bringing consumers what they want, when they want it. RYOT is a innovator in this field, with the first 5G studio in Europe, located in London.As Damara declares: “Now, we are cavemen of the virtual age.” And we can’t wait for the new discoveries to come, thanks to the power of immersive technologies and 5G. Experience The Fabric Of Reality for yourself: the exhibition is open for the next 10 months in the Museum Of Other Realities via HTC and Oculus VR headsets. Or you can re-watch our livestream and get additional content, all at thefabricofreality.com 
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Tailwinds from energy conservation laws that necessitate energy-efficient insulation is a significant factor fuelling the steady growth of the global industrial insulation market.Booming digital economies of the Asia Pacific such as India are a prime source of future growth prospects."Market players will witness a cascading effect in demand for industrial insulation products on the back of multiplying consumption of electricity, fuel, and petro-chemicals in developing economies," Opines Fact.MR AnalystGlobal Industrial Insulation Market- Key TakeawaysStone Wool based insulation products will generate 1.8X revenue during the forecast period (2019 - 2029).Pipe products hold a majority share among product types, accounting for over 47% of the total market revenue.EIP (Eco-Industrial Park) applications constitute a significant segment for market players holding over one-third of aggregate market demand.Petrol-chemicals and refinery applications exhibit an impressive 6% CAGR during the projection period.Industrial insulation market in South Asia & Oceania is a lucrative region for manufacturers, growing at a robust 8% CAGR through 2029.Know the COVID-19 Impact, Request for Sample @ https://www.factmr.com/connectus/sample?flag=S_id=4675 Global Industrial Insulation Market- Key DriversEnhanced product output by insulating temperature-sensitive processes is a significant factor driving the demand for industrial insulation from manufacturing units.Industrial insulation reduces carbon emissions from heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems which furthers the need for industrial insulation as an energy-efficient alternative.Record low and high temperatures across the world is another factor that warrants the use of industrial insulation by companies in extreme temperature countries.Growing awareness about innovative insulation materials such as glass wool and calcium silicate will continue to attract decision-makers from various application industries.Global Industrial Insulation Market- Key RestraintsLack of a uniform standard of installation hampers the performance of products and restraints market growth in financially rewarding regions.COVID-19 Impacts Revenue Pipelines in the Near-futureCOVID-19 pandemic is affecting every industry.Market players must plan innovative strategies that adhere to the new ways of doing business in the post-pandemic world.Governments across the globe are issuing strict social distancing rules to curb the social transmission of COVID-19.As data-centres run on electricity, power generation applications will require more insulation products to increase their production capacity.
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The global Ethylene Market size is expected to reach USD 186.5 billion by 2026 according to a new study by Polaris Market Research.The report “Ethylene Market Share, Size, Trends, Industry Analysis Report By Feedstock (Naphtha, Ethane, Propane, Butane); By Application (Polyethylene, Ethylene Oxide, Ethyl Benzene, Ethylene Dichloride); By End-Use (Building & Construction, Automotive, Packaging, Textiles, Agriculture & Agrochemicals); By Region, Segment Forecast, 2020 – 2026” gives a detailed insight into current market dynamics and provides analysis on future market growth.Ethylene demand has witnessed robust growth in the recent past and this trend is expected to continue from 2019 to 2026. growth of hospitality construction is expected to benefit the demand for ethylene derived products over the forecast period.In the recent past, in order to help the hospitality sector bounce back to normalcy, governments across the globe had intervened in the past and it is expected that they will do the same to help recover the industry post pandemic.Global ethylene operating rates remained stable during the year 2017 and 2018 and decreased slightly in 2019.This was mostly due to the limited capacity additions as compared to the demand.Project delays, cancellations in post pandemic world order is bound to be a reality which is likely to influence the feed availability, and further tightening of supply.Request for sample copy of this report @  https://www.polarismarketresearch.com/industry-analysis/ethylene-market/request-for-sampleThe rate of proposed capacity additions is much higher than the anticipated demand.Therefore, as compared to historical operating rates, the estimated operating rates of ethylene plants is bound to be considerably lower.There has been witnessed somewhat dilution of the relation between the market growth linked to the GDP elasticity in the past few years.
Hi! Welcome to the Insider Advertising daily for August 25. I'm Lauren Johnson, a senior advertising reporter at Business Insider. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. Send me feedback or tips at [email protected] Today's news: Amazon's new advertising metric, streaming companies bet on going global, and the power players of TikTok in the US. Amazon started showing a favored metric for advertisers this month, making it easier for large brands to compare ad efficiency against Google and Facebook Eugene Kim reported that Amazon rolled out an advertising metric called "return on ad spend" for sponsored ads this month. The metric is different from "advertising cost of sales," the previous metric that Amazon's advertisers used to track ad effectiveness. The new metric addresses large advertisers' asks for better ways to measure the ad performance on Amazon against Facebook and Google. Read the full story here. International expansion will make or break streaming TV services. Experts explain the challenges Disney, WarnerMedia, Starz, and others face. Media companies like Disney are realizing that global expansion is key to streaming success, reports Ashley Rodriguez. ViacomCBS, Discovery, and WarnerMedia plan to expand their services internationally but face challenges that early streaming companies like Netflix and Apple did not, including navigating pre-existing distribution deals and picking the brands to peg their platform to. "The biggest issue in general for these services is they've already sold a lot of their content into longterm deals internationally," said Eric Haggstrom, forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence. Read the full story here. These are the 29 power players steering TikTok's rise in the US With TikTok's US operations facing threats from the Trump administration, Paige Leskin identified the 29 most important people running TikTok's US business. The executives include US general manager Vanessa Pappas and Michael Beckerman, head of US public policy, in addition to CEO Kevin Mayer. Blake Chandlee, vp of global business solutions, is responsible for spearheading TikTok's advertising business, which has grown to include ad formats like branded AR effects and in-feed videos. Read the full story here. More stories we're reading: Several Google products are close to joining the billion-user club. Here are Google's biggest money makers with 1 billion users, and the products that could be next. (Business Insider) 20 CEOs of thriving DTC brands like Olipop and The Naked Market reveal why their companies will succeed in a post-pandemic world (Business Insider) Starbucks' Pumpkin Spice Latte returns on Tuesday, the earliest ever debut of the iconic autumnal drink (Business Insider) Color of Change: The Facebook boycott was 'somewhat of a start, but there's still a long way to go' (AdExchanger) CVS debuts its own media network (AdAge) Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at [email protected] and subscribe to this daily email here. — LaurenJoin the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why American sunscreens may not be protecting you as much as European sunscreens
Shielding against identity theft in a post-pandemic world.
Uber has had a rough 2020 as the coronavirus has decimated the demand for rides. But while users sit at home, Uber's delivery business has thrived, growing 79% during the first half of the year. The pandemic's disruptions have indicated that CEO Dara Khosrowshahi was wise to diversify his business à la Amazon, three analysts told Business Insider. Are you a current or former Uber employee? Do you have an opinion about what it's like to work there? Contact this reporter at [email protected], on Signal at 646-768-4712, or via his encrypted email address [email protected] Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Uber has had a difficult year as the coronavirus has emptied offices, shut down bars, and smothered travel. Between January and June, the ride-hailing giant burned through 31% of its cash reserves and saw its overall app usage decline 26% from the first six months of 2019. But in a twist, three analysts who follow the company told Business Insider that the pandemic's massive disruptions to daily life have only strengthened the long-term case for Uber's business model, which envisions a platform that can host a wide range of transportation-related services beyond rides — like local deliveries, long-haul trucking, and public-transit logistics — on a global scale. Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has compared the scope of the company's vision to that of Amazon, which has branched out from selling books online into cloud computing, film production, and self-driving cars. Some have criticized the breadth of such ambitions, saying Uber will face a thornier path to profitability than Lyft, which is more narrowly focused on ride-hailing and the North America market. In the midst of a global crisis, however, the strategy looks to be paying off. "The diversification, overall, it ended up really helping them," said Dan Ives, an analyst at Wedbush Securities.  Eats has grown rapidly this year While rides are way down, Eats has shined in a world where many restaurants have closed their dining rooms and dedicated their kitchens to pickup and delivery orders. Uber's delivery business grew by 79% during the first half of this year, and its adjusted loss before interest payments, taxes, depreciation, and amortization shrank by 8%. The company hopes its acquisition of Postmates will accelerate that trend through increased market share and lower costs. In the long term, Uber envisions its delivery service expanding far beyond meals: It has already started ferrying groceries, prescriptions, and packages on a limited scale. "We're leveraging food delivery to build a real-time logistics engine for all local commerce," Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said during Uber's second-quarter earnings call. Adding new products to its delivery service is a smart move, said Tom White, an analyst at DA Davidson, as Uber builds on its core strength — connecting consumers, drivers, and businesses — and opens it to larger retail markets that could offer higher profit margins. The more items Uber can deliver, the more customers will use its app while demand for rides is low, White said. In a post-pandemic world, that could give Uber's ride-hailing business a boost over competitors that had fewer ways to keep customers engaged when they were at home. Investors may agree with White. Lyft's shares were priced at $43 at the beginning of this year, while Uber's sold for $30. Since January, that gap has closed. When markets opened on Tuesday, Uber was trading at $32, compared to Lyft at $31. Benjamin Black, an analyst at Evercore ISI, once doubted the wisdom of Uber's diversification strategy. But he's come around. "Having several irons in the fire turned out to be beneficial to them," he said. Uber is showing more discipline Uber may be spreading out, but it's no longer seeking to grow at all costs. The company's management team has shown it has the discipline to scale back when needed, White said, as it continues to exit markets where it doesn't see a path to a dominant position. This year, the company has also laid off about a quarter of its workforce, closed 40 offices, and sold its electric bike and scooter business to Lime. "These guys have shown that they're willing to make tough decisions," White said. Uber has predicted those moves will help it become profitable on an adjusted basis — excluding interest payments, taxes, depreciation, and amortization — before the end of next year. That would represent a major improvement over the second quarter of this year, when its adjusted EBITDA was -$837 million (good for a -44% margin), but Black, Ives, and White said they believe Uber will hit that target. The cost cuts have reduced the revenue Uber will need to reach adjusted EBITDA profitability, and demand for rides has been steadily improving in recent months, Black said. Add in the fact that Uber is keeping a higher percentage of the money customers spend on rides and deliveries, and the company is in a good position to stem its losses next year, Black said, assuming there isn't another wave of shelter-in-place orders. "I don't think it's a question of if they'll do it in 2021," he said. "It's more when." Are you a current or former Uber employee? Do you have an opinion about what it's like to work there? Contact this reporter at [email protected], on Signal at 646-768-4712, or via his encrypted email address [email protected] Read more: Uber's business got slammed by COVID-19. Two key data points show just how ugly things have gotten. Uber, Facebook, and Booking.com are best picks to play unfolding recovery, Wall Street analyst says A California judge ruled that Uber and Lyft have to classify their drivers as employees, not contractors Uber reports a $1.78 billion loss as its food-delivery business outshines rides for the first time  SEE ALSO: Dhivya Suryadevara is leaving GM, where she was part of the only female CEO-CFO team in the auto industry Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's what it's like to travel during the coronavirus outbreak
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With the global onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, our lives and lifestyles have been disrupted like never before.Governments have shuttered non-essential services to prevent the spread of the deadly virus, educational institutes have resorted to online classes, and work from home has become the new normal for most businesses.The advancement of technology and our dependence on it was already on a rise before the lockdown.And, this was simply accelerated further in the new reality brought in by the COVID-19 situation.In this scenario, where the focus is on mitigating the challenges brought up by the pandemic, modern technology has offered several solutions to make life a lot easier for everyone.Having said that, here are the top trends in technology that have emerged in the pandemic world, which will continue to reign even after the global crisis is averted.The multiple avenues of online educationDue to the lockdown, schools and colleges have had to resort to online classes to get things done.Video conferencing has become commonplace and increased demand has been noted for e-learning resources.A major spurt in growth has also been noted in the learning apps as the students are more reliant on their mobile phones now to understand the concepts taught in class.Even tests and assessments are being conducted online.These trends of online education are expected to continue in the post-pandemic world, as well.After all, both the learners and the educators understand that it’s still some time before things become completely normal, and so, they will have to complete a major chunk of their curriculum online.Read Also –  What are the big business ideas that will emerge from the COVID-19 Pandemic?Virtual meetings over face-to-face sessionsDiscussing post corona technology trends remains incomplete without mentioning the remote meetings.
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It is not that India started to think on challenges of innovation when the pandemic struck.The supportive environment has been evolved in the last few years and Corona crisis has sharpened the focus.
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It’s perfectly timed for a post-pandemic world where we’re all going to be too paranoid to touch anything outside our homes.
The storied investment bank is seeing leadership shakeups under CEO David Solomon and a slew of partner departures.  Goldman has been moving away from high-risk businesses like trading and is making pushes into more stable areas like consumer lending, wealth management, and transaction banking.  There have been big cultural changes, too. Solomon is looking to create a more transparent workplace, while new tech execs are taking cues from Silicon Valley heavy-hitters.  At Business Insider, we are closely tracking the latest developments at Goldman. You can read all of our Goldman coverage on BI Prime. Storied Wall Street bank Goldman Sachs is going through some massive changes under CEO David Solomon. It's taken big steps involving transparency and inclusion to change up its culture. It has seen a slew of partner departures — many in the securities division. And it's making big pushes into businesses like wealth management and transaction banking.   The latest on people moves, consumer strategy, return to office Goldman Sachs is building an AI-powered digital assistant and checking account for its Marcus consumer bank. Here's how it's shaping up. Inside Goldman Sachs's first in-person board meeting since the pandemic began Goldman Sachs designed its glitzy London office with tons of amenities, but little parking. In a post-pandemic world, it could be a big snag as the firm looks to bring workers back in. $60 billion quant fund Two Sigma just hired Goldman Sachs' first-ever chief data officer to lead its massive tech team Why Goldman Sachs, which has a $509 billion wealth business geared towards ultra-rich clients, is buying a small Virginia fintech for financial advisers and retail investors Goldman Sachs just hired Kurt Hoffman, an expert in distressed situations and bankruptcy, to join a trading unit known for some of the bank's most lucrative deals Goldman Sachs' top tech exec explains how a fresh slew of senior hires are transforming the bank's approach to building products Read the full memo Goldman Sachs just sent naming 4 execs to lead its private-equity investments across the merchant-banking division Culture and talent Goldman Sachs' summer internship is going virtual, joining the likes of Bank of America and Morgan Stanley who are running remote programs Read the full memo Goldman Sachs just sent to staff announcing its new head of regulatory affairs. The former White House counsel will be tasked with helping clean up the bank's 1MDB drama. Goldman Sachs just hired 2 senior recruiting execs focused on luring top talent from other firms —and it's a huge departure from the firm's traditional promote-from-within mentality Read the full memo David Solomon just sent to 38,000 Goldman Sachs employees explaining why he's moving his management team out of stuffy offices and into open seating Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon and his management team are ditching their stuffy offices and moving to an open floor plan closer to the people so they can feel the buzz of New York headquarters Goldman Sachs just unveiled a new gender pronouns initiative as part of a broader inclusion push at the Wall Street firm Read the memo Goldman Sachs just sent to its employees unveiling a new pronouns initiative Coronavirus response Inside a 38,000-person remote work rollout at Goldman Sachs: sleepless nights, assembly lines, and an Amazon-like hub on a Manhattan trading floor How a massive New York hospital secured 130,000 N95 masks from China with help from a senior partner at Goldman Sachs, private jets, and a call to Warren Buffett Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon just sent a firm-wide voicemail about the coronavirus crisis. Here's what he told employees. Goldman Sachs and Bank of America just updated their WFH policies — again. Here's what they're telling employees about the latest steps aimed at combating the spread of coronavirus. Read the full memo Goldman Sachs top brass just sent detailing the firm's coronavirus contingency plans, including separating employees into 'blue' and 'white' teams to alternate working from the office and home Consumer push, transaction banking, wealth management Goldman Sachs just announced its first partnership for transaction banking as it looks to build a new $1 billion business moving money around the world Goldman Sachs is sending much less mail to potential Marcus customers. A senior exec lays out the reason why. A Goldman Sachs exec explains why the bank isn't sweating concerns over the Apple Card's profitability A Wall Street firm crunched the numbers around how much Apple will make from its new credit card with Goldman Sachs Here's why Goldman Sachs just did its biggest deal in nearly 20 years as part of a pivot to less wealthy clients Goldman Sachs execs are opening up about their plans for Marcus, and they think it can do to banking what iTunes did to the music industry Goldman Sachs' partnership with Apple could move it a step closer to being 'a bank branch in your pocket' Human resources is the next battleground for Wall Street wealth advisers as Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs jockey over new turf Goldman Sachs has a novel method for predicting the next economic slump, and it's at the heart of its hot new business Technology Amazon just entered the small business loan market with Goldman. Here's how the e-commerce giant is building a bank for itself. JPMorgan and Goldman Sachs are finally beginning to embrace fintech startups. Here's how they test the waters before committing to working with them. We talked to the execs behind Bloomberg's new data partnership with Goldman Sachs. Here's why they think it's a sign of Wall Street's future. Goldman Sachs is putting its own Marquee app on Amazon's cloud in a pitch to lure more fintech developers Goldman Sachs is embracing open-source code and its chief data officer says it's part of a "new world" of software Read the memo the new Goldman tech chief sent to the firm's 9,000-plus engineers where he urges them to ditch presentations in favor of Amazon's famous narratives A new Goldman Sachs tech exec hired from Amazon is taking a page from the Jeff Bezos playbook by urging engineers to ditch PowerPoint and write memos Goldman Sachs' new CTO shares his strategy for attracting outside developers to work more closely with the bank, giving a glimpse into the future of how Wall Street will work A Verizon executive is joining Goldman Sachs as chief technology officer as the Wall Street bank reshuffles its ranks Marty Chavez is retiring from Goldman Sachs. We chatted with him about the bank's tech transformation, why now is the right time for him to step down, and what he's planning next. Goldman Sachs tech guru Marty Chavez is retiring from the bank Goldman Sachs' CEO just warned that the bank's big tech bets might not pay off as quickly as people hope Goldman Sachs is scrapping a homegrown email app it once touted — and it's a sign the bank is moving away from building tech in house Goldman Sachs is exploring plans to create a Netflix for data, and it marks a new frontier for Wall Street Goldman Sachs' internal idea factory hatched a plan for the Google of Wall Street, and it's now looking for the next big thing to disrupt the bank Goldman Sachs' big bet on the future of Wall Street had a rocky start. Here's the inside story of the bank's struggle to grow its next business and an exclusive look at its plans Trading Inside the rise of Ram Sundaram, the leader of a secretive Goldman Sachs desk that's minting billions by designing some of the bank's most imaginative — and controversial — trades Bank of America is shaking up its global markets division and poached a Goldman Sachs exec to fill a key new role Goldman Sachs' massive quant business now rivals AQR and Two Sigma. We talked to the bank's top quant about asset growth, finding data sources, and why critics of computerized trading are wrong. Goldman Sachs' CEO tells us the bank is winning over quant clients. That helped it outpace rivals like JPMorgan last quarter. Goldman Sachs is cutting about 5% of sales and trading staff after senior equities leaders delivered a tough town-hall talk Goldman Sachs is moving away from a tool championed by its former CFO as it pushes its traders to see clients where they once saw quick wins Goldman Sachs is shuffling its top stock trading executives as the business tries to claw back market share from Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan Goldman Sachs's bond trading unit is still trying to find its way — and it represents a key challenge for new CEO David Solomon Alternatives Read the full memo Goldman Sachs just sent naming 4 execs to lead its private-equity investments across the merchant-banking division Goldman Sachs is making targeted hires for a 'storefront' for alternative investments that's modeled after firms like KKR and Blackstone Goldman Sachs' push into private equity is ruffling feathers at Blackstone — and it might be a sign of big client skirmishes to come Goldman Sachs execs are jockeying for control of the firm's lucrative private investing units after a plan to merge it — and the stakes couldn't be higher Meet the Goldman Sachs execs tasked with building the firms' new Blackstone-esque private-investing unit — and pumping up the bank's flagging stock price 'It's good to be Rich': Meet the Goldman Sachs banker who has built a private investing empire that goes head-to-head with Blackstone — and you've probably never heard of him Goldman Sachs is considering a shakeup of its alternative investing units as part of a plan to simplify the bank's strategy Deals Goldman Sachs is assembling a team of senior bankers focused on middle-market private equity. Here are the key hires and the playbook they'll use to land new clients. Goldman Sachs unloaded some of its WeWork shares before its investment bankers pitched investors on what it once considered a $60 billion-plus IPO Goldman Sachs just revealed it sold part of its Uber stake to SoftBank and it helped boost a $4.5 billion business A senior Goldman Sachs fintech banker was about to join JPMorgan — but then got lured back —and it's another sign of the fierce battle for M&A talent Goldman just promoted a star tech banker close to Tesla and Microsoft to co-head one of its most profitable businesses, as incoming CEO Solomon makes his mark Goldman Sachs just announced a shakeup of its leadership — and it signals the rise of bankers over traders A tug-of-war between Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan over a top banker highlights Wall Street's $1 trillion battleground Investor day 2020 Inside Goldman Sachs' first investor day, where avocado toast and crab apples were served with tech talk, 3-year plans, and a surprising trading mea culpa Goldman Sachs just revealed a new wealth brand at its first-ever investor day. It shows how the bank is trying to reshape its strategy — and image. Goldman Sachs just unveiled hundreds of slides laying out the future of the company. Here are the 10 crucial slides that show how it plans to transform into a bank for everyone. Goldman Sachs is rethinking how it makes private-equity bets with its own money – and one analyst thinks that shift will be a big driver of its stock price Careers  Goldman Sachs is now hiring high-school graduates for roles in Salt Lake City, one of the company's 'high value' locations Goldman Sachs has lost at least 54 partners since David Solomon became CEO. We're keeping a running list — and compiling details from insiders about how the exits are being celebrated. Read the full memo Goldman Sachs' top brass just sent to staff announcing 2 heads of the bank's private-investing arm are out as it's gearing up to raise billions 2 coheads of Goldman Sachs' private-investing business are retiring, in a blow to David Solomon's fundraising plans A Goldman Sachs partner who just resigned is leaving behind a job overseeing $2 billion for a London VC with a leading stake in neobank Revolut Read the memo announcing the departure of Adam Korn, the Goldman Sachs exec who was 'instrumental in building and championing' innovations like the bank's Marquee platform Another Goldman Sachs partner is out. HR chief Dane Holmes is the latest key player to leave the Wall Street bank in a matter of days. Goldman Sachs is offering buyouts to encourage partners to leave as CEO David Solomon works to shrink one of the most elite clubs on Wall Street Goldman Sachs is making renewable energy a big priority based on its hiring strategy. It's a sign that its ideas incubator is working. The David Solomon era at Goldman Sachs kicked off with 43 words Lloyd Blankfein would never say Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon shares his best leadership advice Goldman Sachs is shaking up the way it stocks one of the most elite clubs on Wall Street — and it shows how banks are back to making money again Goldman Sachs' 1MDB problems are eating into employee morale, and insiders worry the firm will use its legal woes as an excuse to scrimp on bonuses Goldman Sachs is about to move dozens of jobs out of pricey New York to Utah as Wall Street turns to cheaper cities SEE ALSO: We identified the 70 most powerful people at JPMorgan. Here's our exclusive org chart. SEE ALSO: We mapped out Citi's 40 most powerful investment bankers. Here's our exclusive org chart. SEE ALSO: Here are the 30 most powerful people in Bank of America's $8 billion bond-trading division Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
The pandemic has created a surge in demand for car rental services. Subscription car service Drover more than doubled the amount of subscriptions sold in May compared to a year ago. Drover just announced a £20.5 million ($26 million) round to grow its business in the UK and France. The round was co-led by new investors Target Global, RTP Global, and Autotech Ventures. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Subscription car service Drover has raised £20.5 million ($26 million) in fresh funding, as the pandemic accelerates demand for car rentals. Drover is a 'car-as-a-service' platform offering insurance, road tax, and maintenance cover on top of the cost of flexibly hiring a car for a single monthly subscription fee. It was co-founded by Felix Leuschner and Matt Varughese in 2016 to target a gap in the market for longer-term car rentals.  "Our usership is probably seeing a bit of a renaissance in the sense that suddenly people are a bit more wary about public transport or shared transport," said founder and CEO Leuschner.  Drover's funding was co-led by new investors Target Global, RTP Global, and Autotech Ventures.  The startup may be well-position to benefit from changing transport habits due to the coronavirus. Almost 40% of people in London expect to use public transport less post-lockdown than they did before the pandemic, according to a YouGov poll in April. And a faltering economy has pushed customers to reject costly car ownership. In May, car sales fell 89% on the same month last year, according to the Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders.  "The car market is one of the last markets that's still really dominated by brick-and-mortar retailers," said Leuschner. "What Amazon has done to so many parts of the high street hasn't really happened in the car world yet." He added: "The combination of both being digital and being flexible, I think it's a great value proposition ... especially [for] younger customers, who we predominantly serve." Drover's approach allows customers to access car services in much the same way as they shop for anything online, removing the need for them to take on debt or to invest in an asset that will likely depreciate. As a result, Drover's average customer is in their 30s, compared to the average car buyer who tends to be in their 50s, according to Leuschner.  The startup last raised in 2018, when it scooped a £5.5 million ($6.9 million) Series A from Cherry Ventures, Partech, and BP Ventures, all of which also participated in the latest round. Two years down the line, it was time to raise again, said Leuschner. The timing just happened to coincide with the pandemic, which has had a positive impact on trading activity in the last two months.  "As we're coming out of it [lockdown], we have seen a significant uptick in demand," said Leuschner. "We have very much been a growing business; we have more than doubled our business last year." Drover finished the second quarter with record-high revenue, which "made this process probably a lot easier,"  said Leuschner. "But it was also the first time for me that I did a fundraise completely on Zoom." The startup plans to use the money to scale the business across the UK and France, where it launched earlier this year despite a more restrictive lockdown. Leuschner is also looking to launch Drover elsewhere, stating he has "pan-European ambition" for the business.  The investment will also be used to ramp up investment in its tech and to fund a nationwide marketing campaign. Ben Kaminski, partner at venture capital firm Target Global, said Drover had already been seeing huge growth potential pre-pandemic. "It's the perfect market for a digital player to come in because of the heavy fragmentation you have and the low levels of digitalization," he told Business Insider. This kind of market disruption will become more common in a post-pandemic world, according to Leuschner. "People today do a lot of things suddenly online that they haven't done before," he said. "Even the idea of getting a car online, which may sound weird, maybe crazy for some people six months ago, suddenly feels a lot more normal and natural."Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
Sabinna Rachimova is a designer who’s ahead of the curve when it comes to communicating with her customers and pioneering new ideas, both in terms of her handcrafted-meets-futuristic approach to fashion, and her experimentation with immersive technologies and sales techniques.The Russian-born, Austrian-raised designer behind the line SABINNA has always been fascinated with creating things with her own hands, and her London-based womenswear label has a strong brand identity centred on storytelling, consciousness, innovating and bringing people together.The Central Saint Martins grad was taught traditional handcraft techniques from her grandmother years ago, and is passionate about the importance of handicraft in fashion. Handcraft pieces are individualised and made with love,  they have an ability to unite people across communities and generations and offer mental health benefits for the crafter, too.“Handcraft allows you to reconnect with your thoughts and creativity. It’s a therapeutic session. There was a lot of anxiety in lockdown; people had time and had to calm their nerves, and handcraft is beautiful for that. Plus, there’s a sense of accomplishment - you make something and have a final result right away,” Sabinna tells HuffPost UK in a phone interview.Not only does handcrafting allow for an opportunity to reconnect with yourself and recalibrate your mental health, it also nurtures sustainability. As Sabinna notes: “People have lost touch with how products are made and what’s behind them. If you understand what’s behind them, the more value you can see in clothes.” Sabinna is one of three designers participating in a visionary, hyper-immersive virtual fashion show experience on July 29, presented by Verizon’s in-house creative studio, RYOT, along with Charli Cohen and Damara, titled The Fabric of Reality.  While Sabinna’s fashion label is all about the primacy of beautiful handiwork - to connect us with both past and present, to bring individuals together through time and space - the designer is also passionate about how immersive technologies can revolutionise the fashion sphere: ethically, sustainably and creatively. Sabinna is known for her creative approach to selling and direct communication with her customers, like shaking up how her clothes are presented. She showcased her fourth season collection using Pictofit AR technology on a Microsoft HoloLens, which allowed customers to try on the garments using AR and to switch outfits with a simple hand gesture.She’s also well versed in how fashion brands can interact and communicate with consumers directly. In pre-pandemic times, the brand hosted a variety of in-store experiences, inviting customers to participate in hand-crafting workshops and to co-design garments in store.“When lockdown happened, that part of the business had to be rethought as quickly as possible. I’ve always been keen on digital spaces, and always tried to bring innovation where and how we can, so we moved all our workshops and events to digital spaces, and we looked at what the demand is now,” she says. The pandemic provided the initial inspiration for Sabinna’s The Fabric of Reality fashion project, which she collaborated on with VR designer, Vladimir Ilic, who’s just as keen to explore the relationship between tradition and innovation as she is.The concept for Sabinna’s virtual story world captures that collective feeling we can all now recognise: the breath of relief when you first step out the door after days, weeks or even longer in isolation.“Instead of entering, why not exit into a virtual world? Going out is something we’ve all missed,” says Sabinna.In Sabinna’s story world, everything is handcrafted: objects are stitched, hand-crocheted and hand-knit, with a sculptural, transparent, multi-layered garment at the centre. She used the family archive of original embroideries her grandmother created 30 years ago, which feature the woods and landscapes from central Asia where her granny grew up, to recreate the experience of texture in the virtual world. Sound helps to bring the story to life.“The sound aspect can make or break this experience, too. Through sound, we manage to give people a feeling of comfort, home, connection and understanding that something has a special meaning. It brings an emotional aspect to visitors of the exhibition.”Sabinna’s story world theme also asks the viewer to co-create as part of the project, to virtually pin flowers on the garment in whatever pattern they like. Unlike virtual fashion shows that have tried to replicate the physical in the digital realm, the idea behind The Fabric of Reality is about introducing viewers to something they would never be able to experience in person.“The concept is about how to reconnect with yourself while exiting into a post-pandemic world,” says Sabinna. “It’s built on nature and mindfulness and the idea is that you can interact with things, create prints, add to items and have a full 360-degree experience, rather than just being a viewer of something. It will help you remember the experience on a very different level.”Inviting the viewer to become a co-creator is about more than enhancing their time in the virtual world - although who isn’t excited about the potential to play designer for an evening? Sabinna feels that the more customers understand what goes into the creativity, design and manufacture of a garment, the more they’ll appreciate how crucial sustainability is to the whole process.It’s clear the pandemic is already changing how people approach their fashion purchases: they’re buying more for a lifetime rather than a season, and thinking about when they really need a physical product, as well as what makes a product special (and therefore worthy of purchasing). The current crisis has provided an opportunity to shift the focus to what the demand really is, as well as changing our attitudes towards technology - digital means something else now than it did pre-pandemic, and has become something we’ve all become much more comfortable with and conversant in.“My hope is that after this pandemic fashion will not go back to normal. My hope is that finally this stubborn industry will wake up and create new systems, create new ways to work in a smarter and more inclusive way.“We can finally bring a new layer to make it more diverse through the digital system. This might not be a popular opinion but there is no going back to Fashion Week the way it used to be - I just don’t see a need for it,” says Sabinna.For Sabinna, much of the excitement she feels for this project has been bridging the physical and virtual realms, as well as introducing consumers to the possibility of using immersive technologies to help design physical garments. For customers to emerge with their own semi-bespoke creation they can wear in everyday life at the end of this would be the “perfect outcome” in the designer’s mind.“I get really excited because there are no boundaries and no limits in the virtual world. I don’t have to worry if it fits, if it’s wearable, but I’m excited about how it can be commercially valuable. Fashion is a business, clothes are made to be worn,” she says.The Fabric Of Reality, presented by RYOT and featuring Sabinna, Damara and Charli Cohen, airs July 29.
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Tailwinds from energy conservation laws that necessitate energy-efficient insulation is a significant factor fuelling the steady growth of the global industrial insulation market.Booming digital economies of the Asia Pacific such as India are a prime source of future growth prospects.As digitization picks up pace in developing countries, power generation applications of industrial insulation products are touted to be a lucrative segment for market players.“Market players will witness a cascading effect in demand for industrial insulation products on the back of multiplying consumption of electricity, fuel, and petro-chemicals in developing economies,” Opines Fact.MR AnalystGlobal Industrial Insulation Market- Key TakeawaysStone Wool based insulation products will generate 1.8X revenue during the forecast period (2019 – 2029).Pipe products hold a majority share among product types, accounting for over 47% of the total market revenue.EIP (Eco-Industrial Park) applications constitute a significant segment for market players holding over one-third of aggregate market demand.Petrol-chemicals and refinery applications exhibit an impressive 6% CAGR during the projection period.Industrial insulation market in South Asia & Oceania is a lucrative region for manufacturers, growing at a robust 8% CAGR through 2029.Know the COVID-19 Impact, Request for Sample @ https://www.factmr.com/connectus/sample?flag=S_id=4675 Global Industrial Insulation Market- Key DriversEnhanced product output by insulating temperature-sensitive processes is a significant factor driving the demand for industrial insulation from manufacturing units.Industrial insulation reduces carbon emissions from heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems which furthers the need for industrial insulation as an energy-efficient alternative.Record low and high temperatures across the world is another factor that warrants the use of industrial insulation by companies in extreme temperature countries.Growing awareness about innovative insulation materials such as glass wool and calcium silicate will continue to attract decision-makers from various application industries.Global Industrial Insulation Market- Key RestraintsLack of a uniform standard of installation hampers the performance of products and restraints market growth in financially rewarding regions.COVID-19 Impacts Revenue Pipelines in the Near-futureCOVID-19 pandemic is affecting every industry.Market players must plan innovative strategies that adhere to the new ways of doing business in the post-pandemic world.Governments across the globe are issuing strict social distancing rules to curb the social transmission of COVID-19.As data-centres run on electricity, power generation applications will require more insulation products to increase their production capacity.
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It seems as if the post-pandemic world shall not only change the way we interact with other people around us in real life but also bring a massive change and difference when it comes to taking selfies.https://www.kashishworld.com/blog/apple-wins-patent-for-software-that-would-generate-synthetic-group-selfies/
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The impact of the coronavirus pandemic extends well beyond the world of sport but there's no ignoring the seismic reshuffle the outbreak will force on the football calendar.England Vs Croatia Tickets can be grabbed from our global event ticket sales market.UEFA have been under pressure from the Italian FA and others to move this summer's European Championships to 2021 and they announced on Tuesday that that would be the case.The decision makes sense but thinking ahead to a post-pandemic world, what impact will this have on the nations taking part?Some would have arguably had a better shot at success if the tournament had been played this year, but others could prosper from the delay.Here is a look at the winners and losers of Euro 2020 becoming Euro 2021.WinnersHolland At a best-priced 7-1, Holland were the dark horses for many punters going into this summer's tournament and the one-year delay could render the Oranje even stronger.The Dutch are a youthful side, blessed with talent including 21-year-old Donyell Malan, who has scored 11 league goals for PSV this season.Their starlets could do with another 12 months to mature while the young bedrocks of the team Frenkie de Jong and Matthijs de Ligt will now have an additional year to master their craft at giants Barcelona and Juventus.England For many this looked like being England's tournament.After a semi-final berth in Russia two years ago, Gareth Southgate's men have been working towards winning their first continental crown.They were the 9-2 favorites to win the trophy before the pandemic and with the semi-finals and final scheduled to be played at Wembley, it was shaping up to be a summer to remember for the Three Lions.We may still see those scenes of wild pub congregations and Harry Maguire's thumping headers, but not until at least 2021.Football fans can book England Euro Cup Tickets from our global event ticket sales market.There was still an element of doubt over the fitness of England's two main strikers Harry Kane and Marcus Rashford and, like Holland, England have a squad of players on the right side of 30 who could peak just as the delayed tournament rolls around.
French video game publisher Ubisoft will hold a private beta test with a lot of content for Tom Clancy’s The Division 2.Starting February 7 at 1 a.m. Pacific time and running through February 11 at 1 a.m. Pacific, the private beta of The Division 2 will let players get a feel for the post-pandemic world of Washington D.C.I’ve played some of these already at a preview event.They include the early game and endgame missions, and they will be available on the Xbox One, PS4, and PC.Players can secure their access to the private beta by pre-ordering The Division 2, which debuts on March 15 on the above-mentioned platforms.The game takes place about seven months after the events of the previous game, The Division, which debuted in 2016.
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