The first real-world data shows coronavirus vaccines can help us forge a path out of the pandemic.
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"I hope we don't go back to doing business as usual," Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky said in an interview with the Washington Post.
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In this week's edition of the Insider Tech newsletter we look at how the shortage of vaccines and semiconductors hint at the future of tech policy.
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Russia has pledged to distribute millions of doses of its COVID-19 vaccine to countries in Latin America in a demonstration of its "soft power."
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COVID-19 vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna take more than a month, and a second jab, to become fully effective. J&J's one dose vaccine takes 28 days.
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Covaxin becomes the first locally developed vaccine to hit the key milestone.As part of a plan to bolster people’s confidence, PM Modi was given the first shot of Covaxin on 1 March at an event
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All three of the COVID-19 shots authorized for use in the US train the body to recognize the coronavirus, but J&J's uses a cold virus instead of mRNA.
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The vaccine might offer a way out of the pandemic, but it won’t repair our fractured society. After a year when we have seen progress towards women’s equality undermined, we needed a Budget that would ensure a sustainable and equal recovery. Sadly, this year’s fell short of what was needed. As with previous government announcements over the last year, the needs of women have been sidelined.When lockdown first began last year, the implications for women were instant: over 36% of young women employed in shutdown sectors like hospitality, leisure and tourism. Prior to the coronavirus outbreak and ensuing labour market shock, young women were already facing a gender earnings gap(32.8% for 18-21 age group and 19% for 22-29 age group), discrimination and sexual harassment. The lockdown hit young women particularly hard – overall, women were more likely to be furloughed, taking a 20% pay cut, in 72% of parliament constituencies across the UK.At home, women across England saw a rise in unpaid work as schools and nurseries closed. Lack of available support has meant an increased amount of unpaid work and multitasking duties, severely impacting women’s time for paid work. Consequently, 46% of mothers being made redundant said that lack of childcare was a factor in their selection for redundancy. We needed a Budget that would take immediate action to mitigate the worst impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on different groups on women. Unfortunately, that isn’t what we got. The pandemic has wreaked havoc on people’s mental health too. Mothers are facing the brunt of increased workload with twice as many reporting they would have to take time off with no pay due to school closures or a sick child. Some 51% of single parents are also reporting to have depression, bad nerves and anxiety (compared to 27% of couple parents).At the same time domestic abuse cases rose and cases of femicide as a result of domestic abuse more than doubled since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic.This is all to say we needed a Budget that would take immediate action to mitigate the worst impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on different groups on women. Unfortunately, that isn’t what we got.The Chancellor extended the furlough scheme until September, which will protect many jobs in the short term. However, many of those currently furloughed are likely to be worrying if they will have a job once the scheme ends. Women have been furloughed in greater numbers than men during the pandemic, and the gender furlough gap is higher for younger womenthan older women. This isn’t surprising when you consider the sectors that women are more likely to work in.The Chancellor also extended Universal Credit for another six months. Although this is welcome, it is only a short-term fix that risks pushing families into debt and undermining the recovery. The government clearly recognises that UC is not enough to live on at the moment – benefit levels in the UK have been cut over the past ten years, and even with this uplift to UC they are still low compared to other countries. As our research with the Runnymede Trust showed, these cuts disproportionately impacted Black and minority ethnic women. The government clearly recognises that UC is not enough to live on at the moment.  There was nothing in the Budget to address the problems with statutory sick pay (SSP). At the moment, WBG calculations find that 15.5% of women and 10.6% of men do not earn enough to qualify for SSP. The low level of SSP was always unjust – during a pandemic it is not only bad for individuals, but also disastrous for public health. There have been widespread reports of key workers who felt they had no choice but to continue to work when they were ill, or using up annual leave, because they couldn’t afford to self-isolate. And we know that take up of community testing has been low in the poorest areas, again because people fear a positive result would mean they had to self isolate and be left unable to pay rent or bills.Nor was there anything in the budget to address the crisis in the care sector. Women are more likely to need care as adults, more likely to work in the care sector, and more likely to be the ones who have to provide unpaid care if care services are not available. Investment in care would not only be good for these women, it would create much needed jobs. Our research shows investment in the care sector could create 2.7 times as many jobs as investment in construction. So why isn’t care at the heart of recovery plans?The Chancellor did announce some additional money for the violence against women sector. But the £19 million is nowhere near the £393 million, including £173 million for refuges that Women’s Aid estimate is needed to provide sufficient funding for a ‘safe and sustainable’ national network of women’s domestic abuse services.Over the past year we’ve not only seen women suffering the worst economic and social impacts of Covid. Now the government appears to have forgotten about women altogether.Ebyan Abdirahman works with the Women’s Budget GroupRelated...Rishi Sunak's Budget Explained In Two MinutesThe chronic stress brought on by the coronavirus has left us emotionally blunted. Experts share some tips on how to cope.People Like Me Rely On The Universal Credit Uplift. Don’t Take It Away From Us
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Biden told states to treat in-person learning as an essential service, which means prioritizing the vaccination of educators regardless of age.
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The San Diego Zoo. | Photo by Daniel Knighton/Getty Images Several great apes at the San Diego Zoo received two doses each of a COVID-19 vaccine in February, National Geographic reports. The lucky recipients are four orangutans and five bonobos, who were distracted with treats as they got their shots. One of the orangutans is Karen, the first ape to undergo open-heart surgery in 1994. Ape vaccination is a welcome development at the San Diego Zoo, where a troop of eight gorillas tested positive for COVID-19 in January. The sick gorillas were symptomatic but have now recovered, according to the zoo. They’ll likely join their orangutan and bonobo compatriots in vaccination later in the spring. developed by a veterinary pharmaceutical company after the first recorded case of COVID-19 in a dog The... Continue reading…
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The Covidologist-in-chief says we can’t relax on masks and social distancing yet. Hear that, Texas?
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A succession of communication blunders about the vaccine has led some Europeans to see it as second rate.
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On Tuesday, US President Joe Biden announced the United States will have enough vaccine supply to cover all adults by the end of May 2021.President Biden has announced a new partnership between competitors “Johnson & Johnson” and pharmaceutical giant “Merck”.The partnership will help Johnson & Johnson produce more of its single-shot vaccine that was authorized over the weekend for emergency use.Biden’s end of May timeline doesn’t mean all American adults will be vaccinated by then, as administering the shots will take longer.On Tuesday, Biden said, “Two of the largest health care and pharmaceutical companies in the world that are usually competitors are working together on the vaccine”.President Biden also announced that his administration is directing states to prioritize vaccinating teachers, childcare workers, and school staff through the administration’s partnership with pharmacies.Johnson & Johnson started shipping out 4 million doses early Monday morning.
Market HighlightsThe Global Animal Vaccines Market is expected to grow at an approximate CAGR of 5.65% during forecast period, 2018–2023.Increasing participation of market players is the key factor driving the animal vaccines market.For instance, in 2015, Boehringer Ingelheim launched two new swine vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) i.e.Ingelvac PRRSFLEX EU for piglets and ReproCyc PRRS EU for breeding gilts.Request Sample Copy:https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/7184Various other factors such as increasing incidence of livestock diseases, technological advancements, increasing adoption of companion animals, and rising government initiatives are also expected to propel the growth of the market.Regional AnalysisThe Americas dominated the global market for animal vaccines owing to the presence of major market players, rising pet adoption and developed economies like US and Canada within the region.According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), nearly 6.5 million companion animals enter US animal shelters nationwide every year.In 2017, it was estimated that Europe stood second in the global animal vaccines market.This can be attributed to the rising research and development investments.For instance, in 2018, Boehringer Ingelheim announced to reinforce its leading position in the veterinary vaccine market with 70 million euro investment in the R and biological production activities.Asia Pacific was projected to be the fastest growing region in 2017.
He delivered his words in their first bilateral meeting a day earlier and that his American counterpart was open to exploring his proposals on a temporary worker program and helping Mexico obtain more vaccine.He said he didn’t come away with a deal for the US to help Mexico obtain more COVID-19 vaccine.There were questions ahead of the meeting about how the two leaders would get along.It is noteworthy that Obrador had a surprisingly warm relationship with former President Donald Trump that revolved almost exclusively around Mexico’s efforts to stop migrants from reaching the US border.But, on Tuesday, he said there was a lot of laughter in the one hour and 15-minute conversation with Biden that covered nearly all of the main issues in the bilateral relationship.Obrador also said, “There were not any differences, I’m telling you categorically, not a single one”.Obrador said he proposed the US analyze how many workers its economy requires and then design a plan for temporary worker visas that would allow Mexicans and Central Americans to migrate legally for work.
AstraZeneca sold its 7.7% stake in vaccine producer Moderna for around $1 billion last year, a "large proportion" of its 2020 equity portfolio sales.
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Hepatitis B infection market is expected to gain market growth at a potential rate of 5.39% in the forecast period of 2020 to 2027.Hepatitis B virus or HBV can cause serious infection which occurs in the body parts, affecting liver and causes liver disease such as cirrhosis or liver cancer.These infection cannot be determined at an early stage but are visible after certain weeks only.It is a disease which can occur even from birth, mainly caused due to blood transfusions through healthcare settings, dialysis and sharing razors.Hepatitis B vaccine comprises of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) along with viral envelope proteins.Download PDF Sample report @ https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample/?dbmr=global-hepatitis-b-infection-marketKey Players: Global Hepatitis B Infection MarketApotex Inc, Accord Healthcare, Arbutus Biopharma, Aurobindo Pharma, Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, GlaxoSmithKline plc, Gilead Sciences, Inc., Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Par Pharmaceutical, Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.,Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and Zydus Pharmaceuticals, Inc. among other domestic and global players.Market Segmentation: Global Hepatitis B Infection MarketBased on type, hepatitis B infection market is segmented into acute and chronicOn the basis of treatment, hepatitis B infection market is segmented into antiviral drugs, vaccine, immune modulator drugs and surgery.The antiviral drugs segment is further sub-segmented into telbivudine, entecavir, tenofovir disoproxil, lamivudine, and others.The immune modulator drugs segment has been further classified into pegylated interferon and interferon alpha.Hepatitis B infection market is also segmented on the basis of distribution channel into hospital & retail pharmacies and online pharmacies.Focus of the reportCAGR values in the market for the forecast periodKey trends in the market placeMajor players and brandsHistorical and current market size and projection up to 2026.Detailed overview of parent marketChanging market dynamics of the industryReasons to Purchase this ReportThe segment that is expected to dominate the market as well as the segment which holds highest CAGR in the forecast periodRegions/Countries that are expected to witness the fastest growth rates during the forecast periodThe latest developments, market shares, and strategies that are employed by the major market playersEnquiry About Report @ https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/inquire-before-buying/?dbmr=global-hepatitis-b-infection-marketKey insights in the report:Complete and distinct analysis of the market drivers and restraintsKey Market players involved in this industryDetailed analysis of the Market SegmentationCompetitive analysis of the key players involvedAbout Us: Data Bridge Market Research set forth itself as an unconventional and neoteric Market research and consulting firm with unparalleled level of resilience and integrated approaches.
People with asthma have been left angry and confused by the government’s decision not to prioritise all asthmatics for the vaccine, meaning they’ll have their jabs later than originally thought.Those with asthma have been deemed clinically vulnerable throughout the pandemic – people are at a higher risk of Covid if they have “a lung condition that’s not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis)”, the NHS website states. Those with severe asthma are deemed clinically extremely vulnerable.  But many with moderate asthma are disappointed they won’t get the vaccine until their age group is called up. The hashtag #AsthmaticsAtRisk has gained traction on social media, with hundreds of people sharing their stories of struggling to breathe, but not being considered vulnerable enough for the jab.Angela Stapleford, 46, from Dumfries in Scotland, was diagnosed with asthma in her mid-30s. She had attacks that left her with shortness of breath between coughing fits and now carries her reliever inhaler with her everywhere. She will not be prioritised for the vaccine.When she found out, she was shocked and confused. “It felt like the light at the end of the tunnel that had been slowly growing had been pushed further back and had become only a tiny point of light overnight,” she tells HuffPost UK.“Being in the clinically vulnerable category has led me to turn down work in a public environment. It made me feel anxious about going out in public spaces even when restrictions were lowered.”It was previously thought people with severe asthma would be in priority group four as they are “clinically extremely vulnerable individuals” and the remainder of people with asthma would be in priority group six which described “all individuals aged 16 years to 64 years with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality”.All the people HuffPost UK spoke to believed all asthmatics using inhalers, or those eligible for the free flu vaccine, would be in group six. This belief was held by doctors, too. Dr Neil Bhatia, a GP in Hampshire, told The BMJ he had assumed those who regularly received a flu vaccination because of their asthma would be offered the jab.However, this is not the case. While those with severe asthma, who would’ve been sent a shielding letter, remain in priority group four – the national medical director of NHS England, Professor Stephen Powis, explained “that’s those who require regular hospital admission or who take steroid tablets for asthma” – those who’ve had an emergency hospital admission for their asthma, or have been prescribed three courses of steroid tablets in a three-month period, fall into priority group six. And anyone with asthma who does not fall into either of these groups, and is under the age of 50, will be vaccinated after the first nine priority groups. In Scotland, the eligibility is slightly different: those who have a recorded hospital admission because of asthma, or have had three prescriptions of oral prednisolone in the last six months – or 168 tablets in the last six months if they use the Chronic Medication Service – are included in group six.Eligibility for the vaccine is based on advice from experts on the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), whose aim is to prevent as many deaths from Covid-19 as possible.It’s this shift away from the narrative that all people with asthma are at risk – to now just some people being at risk – that is causing a lot of confusion.All the people with asthma that HuffPost UK spoke to don’t fall into either of the vaccine priority groups because they don’t fit the criteria detailed above. However, they still struggle with asthma attacks and have “waves” where they’ll struggle to breathe. Many of them are frightened and anxious to go about normal life after being told for so long that they’re at higher risk.Megan Jane Lillie, 27, from Teesside, has lived with asthma since she was two. “All this time, we’ve been told that we’re more at risk due to our condition,” she says. “When the priority list came to light, severe asthmatics were in group four and the remaining in group six. I feel somewhat robbed.”Lillie can go months, sometimes even years, with her asthma being well controlled. But there are times when the condition – which affects 5.4 million people in the UK – can leave her gasping for air. One episode a few years ago left her crawling into her parents’ room because she couldn’t breathe. “I don’t think people understand the full impact asthma can have on you,” she says.The priority list confusion has caused a lot of anxiety for Lillie, who has heard nothing from her GP and is now in a state of limbo. “I rang my local hospital switchboard and they told me to wait until I get my letter. I have my yearly asthma review this week, so I’m hoping to get some further clarity.“I feel completely lost. I feel like nobody is acknowledging this.” I feel completely lost. I feel like nobody is acknowledging this.Megan Jane Lillie, 27, from TeessideKarishma Champaneria, 26, from Leicestershire, is particularly concerned about the consequences of catching Covid-19 as she’s also from an ethnic minority – another high risk group.One study found adults with asthma specifically from Black and South Asian groups are at an increased risk of hospital admission for Covid.Like Lillie, she has also lived with asthma her entire life and always carries a blue inhaler. “I feel like asthmatics are being discriminated against,” says Champaneria. “It’s worrying, especially as I’m from an ethnic minority.”The 26-year-old was led to believe she’d be having the vaccine in the next few weeks, however now it’s looking like she won’t be vaccinated until July because of her age, with the second dose in flu season – another worry in itself. Even medical professionals don’t appear clear on the guidelines. Sarah, from Lancashire, says her GP initially refused to place her in priority group six, despite the fact she was hospitalised with pneumonia and severe asthma five years ago, which led to her being placed on steroid medication for six months.“I was disappointed and surprised I wasn’t being placed in the group by my GP,” the 33-year-old, who preferred not to share her surname, tells HuffPost UK. “I quoted the criteria from the JVCI and within an hour they U-turned their decision. I’m due my vaccine a week today.”The science that directed the JCVI’s decision to not include millions of asthmatics on the priority list is also being questioned. It’s thought the JCVI used the findings of a study, published in the BMJ, that concluded those with asthma were no more likely to die from Covid than those without asthma. The study looked at more than six million patient records during the spring and summer of 2020, of which 13% had a diagnosis of asthma. They tracked whether people got Covid and what their outcomes were.On February 15, Prof Powis, from NHS England, said: “The good news is that mild asthma, inhaler-treated asthma, doesn’t carry that increased risk for coronavirus, so in fact that’s a good news story for mild asthma sufferers that evidence has shown that the risk is not there for them.”But there is also evidence that shows people with asthma could be at risk of hospitalisation or long-term side effects of Covid, suggests Asthma UK.Another study suggests women with asthma might represent a susceptible sub-group for severe Covid-19 requiring hospitalisation. Roughly 37-53% of all individuals hospitalised with SARS-CoV-2 are women. However, when you factor asthma into the mix, 56-71% of patients with asthma hospitalised for Covid-19 were women, the study found. “It may not necessarily come out that asthmatics are more at risk from death, but certainly we are at increased risk of long Covid complications,” says Sarah. “We’re offered a flu vaccine due to being vulnerable, yet with Covid, which is also a virus that attacks the lungs, we’re told we are no more at risk than a healthy individual.”The long-term health implications of having Covid and asthma shouldn’t be ignored. Gemma Gedling, 25, from Surrey, believes she came down with Covid-19 last year before testing was widely available and says it “knocked her sideways” for six months. The 25-year-old, who has had asthma since she was five, says it’s “terrifying” being on the NHS’s clinically vulnerable list for Covid, but not being prioritised for the vaccine.“The idea of lockdown starting to lift from March 8 indicates I’m going to need to continue self-shielding wherever possible, because I’m too scared to go out into the general population right now unless absolutely necessary,” she says.Some, like Gedling, are relying on the discretion of their doctors to get them fast-tracked for the vaccine, meaning it’s turning into a bit of a postcode lottery that depends on whether GPs are willing to put them forward. This, in itself, might depend on whether there’s enough vaccine supply in the area.Asthma UK – and many asthmatics – are calling on the UK government and governments in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland to prioritise everyone with asthma for the next wave of the vaccine rollout. Sarah Woolnough, the charity’s chief executive, said: “The decision not to prioritise all people with asthma, who are not already in group four and six, ignores the evidence that they are more at risk of going to hospital with Covid and more at risk from long Covid. “There are thousands of people with asthma who will rightly feel anxious, angry and ignored by government. We have been urging the government to ensure everyone with asthma is prioritised in the next vaccine roll out and more than 18,000 people with asthma have signed our petition in support of this.”HuffPost UK understands that adults with mild asthma who do not meet the inclusion criteria will not be included within JCVI priority group six. But asthmatics don’t want to have to wait until their age group is called up before having the vaccine – compared to their peers who do not live asthma. Stapleford, who spent years working with consultants to control her symptoms, says her attacks are under control – but she’ll still get breathless and wheezy. Being in her 40s, she should get the vaccine after the nine priority groups. “I feel slightly relieved,” she says, “but this doesn’t stop me from worrying about younger people with asthma who will have a long wait while still being clinically vulnerable.”Related...Under-50s Will Be Vaccinated Based On Age Not Occupation7 Types Of Chest Pain You Should Never IgnoreWhat People With Diabetes Need To Know About Covid-19 RiskNew Vaccine Passes Could Be Coming. Here’s How They Might Work
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After living through the Covid-19 crisis for a year now, many of us are understandably exhausted, depleted and just burned out. When you consider the unrelenting stress we’ve been under — from fears about the virus to job insecurity to social isolation to political unrest — it’s no wonder people have hit a wall.“Your bandwidth pre-Covid is not your bandwidth now,” Branden Crawford, a cognitive behavioural life coach at Kaleidoscope Family Therapy in Atlanta, told HuffPost. “Even though we are a year into this global pandemic, it’s OK to gently remind yourself that you don’t operate how you did pre-Covid. Be aware of where you are and show yourself some grace.”So what can you do when you feel like you’re running on fumes? Below, experts offer advice on how to deal.1. Pinpoint what’s causing the burnout so you can address the root issue.Maybe it’s being isolated from your friends or the fact that you’ve been stuck in your tiny apartment for months on end. Maybe it’s trying to work from home while taking care of your kids — or something else entirely.“Once you have a sense of what’s causing the burnout, you can take the appropriate steps to improve the negative feelings,” said Samantha Elkrief, a therapist and health coach in New York City.Then focus on tackling whatever element you’re struggling with most. For example, if you need a break from the constant togetherness with your family, maybe you could coordinate something with them so you can have a night to yourself.“One patient I work with has taken turns with his wife the past two weekends because they were both short on alone time after a year working from home and homeschooling two young children,” Elkrief said.If you’re craving connection and a new experience, plan an online activity that isn’t the same ol’ virtual happy hour you were doing last spring.“My friends and I had some fun Zoom cocktail hours and then a few months in, we just burned out on connecting by video,” said Nicole O-Pries, an LGBTQ+ therapist in Virginia. “Instead of just giving up, we took an inexpensive online art class with an instructor in Spain. Our relationships were fostered while experiencing an opportunity to try something new and creative.”2. Incorporate more pleasure into your life.Chances are, pleasure is sorely lacking in your life these days — and no, we don’t just mean sex (though that totally counts, too). We’re talking about any feel-good experience, however small, that helps you slow down and savor the moment.“Check in with yourself and rate your current level of pleasure from 1 to 10,” said Lauren Donelson, a Seattle writer and astrologist who’s training to be a therapist. “See what you could do to increase that even by one number. For example, if you usually take quick showers, but a long, luxurious shower would bump your pleasure up from a 5 to a 6, go for it!”3. Shake up your routine.The schedule you established early on in the pandemic may have given those confusing days and weeks some much-needed structure while providing a sense of normalcy. Now, that same routine may feel stale and monotonous, which could be contributing to your state of apathy.“If you have the option, try changing one or two aspects of your routine for some freshness,” Donelson said. “For example, if you always make coffee at home, get coffee from a coffee shop once a week. A little bit of novelty can go a long way.”4. Make plans for the future.Now that the vaccine rollout is underway, there’s finally some light at the end of the tunnel. While we still have a ways to go before we can let our guards down, we can, at least, begin to plan — or at least dream — about what we’ll do when it’s safe again.“That might include booking a vacation for a certain date in the future that seems reasonable to imagine being feasible,” O-Pries said. “Or you might simply begin to save for the vacation and start doing your research on all the details of your future trip.”She also suggested creating a vision board to create some healthy anticipation.“This situation is temporary, and we need some visual reminders to help us remember that is the case,” O-Pries said.5. Carve out more time for rest.Sleep is essential to our mental and physical well-being, but being truly rested goes beyond how many hours of shuteye you get each night. According to physician and researcher Saundra Dalton-Smith, there are seven different types of rest: physical rest (like sleep or restorative activities like stretching), mental rest (like taking breaks from work), sensory rest (like turning off the lights or disconnecting from our devices), creative rest (like soaking up the beauty of nature or listening to music that inspires you), emotional rest (like saying “no” or being honest about how you really feel), social rest (like limiting your interactions with people who drain you) and spiritual rest (like praying or meditating).“With pandemic burnout, we need a fresh new way to rest that’s more than deep breaths and adequate sleep,” said Dara Bu Elliott, a life and career coach at Wellspace SF in San Francisco.Reflect on which types of rest are lacking in your life. Then schedule a “rest date” with yourself, Elliott suggested. For example, if you need more physical rest, take a restorative yoga class instead of going on your morning run. If you need more sensory rest, dim the lights, close your laptop and sit in silence for a few minutes after you finish work for the day.6. Connect with your inner child.Think back to what things used to light you up as a kid. How can you reintroduce some of those into your adult life?“For example, if you loved playing soccer as a kid, get a soccer ball and play around at the park,” Donelson said. “I loved playing the piano as a kid, and I’ve been playing a lot since the pandemic. My inner child loves it.”Sprinkle more of these joy-inducing activities or items into your week.“Those past positive experiences are the fuel we need to climb out of burnout and to create new ones,” Crawford said.7. Talk to a therapist.When left untreated, burnout can lead to clinical depression or other mental health conditions. If you’re struggling, consider making an appointment to connect with a mental health professional now. (And if cost is a concern, know that online therapy services, such as BetterHelp and Talkspace, tend to be more affordable options.) “It’s normal for folks to be feeling burned out right about now. Having someone there to focus on nothing but you can be a huge help,” Elkrief said. “Mental health concerns are at an all-time high, so finding a therapist can be a great way to help manage feelings of burnout.”Related...How To Be Proactive (When You're Stuck At Home)6 Subtle But Serious Signs You Have A Heart ProblemHow To Look After Your Mental and Physical Health In The Face of Uncertainty
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RBI Governor Shaktikanta Das expressed optimism about the overall COVID-19 situation following the rollout of the vaccines.Das made these remarks in his opening speech at the 41st Meeting of the SAARCFINANCE Governors' Group in virtual format on Monday
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